Mr. Darcy’s Pledge: Spotlight & Giveaway

May 14, 2014 by

Mr. Darcy’s Pledge: Spotlight & Giveaway

I’m thrilled to be back again so soon on Indie Jane after having had my say just a couple of weeks ago about the Jane Austen heroine who doesn’t get as much attention as she ought — Emma. I really enjoyed the discussion of Emma here last month.

 

But today my focus is someone different entirely. It’s Mr. Darcy, whom everyone will agree is the star of the Austen cannon, with perhaps the exception of Captain Wentworth.

 

Though perhaps, in the interest of making a comparison, that in some ways Wentworth scores higher than Darcy. This is because, despite the angst depicted in many of our JA variations and continuations, Darcy does not really have to suffer for long. Things work out for him relatively quickly.

 

What makes Wentworth truly swoon-worthy in my mind is his constancy – the fact that, even after being rejected and after years of separation, he has remained faithful to Anne. In my mind, that makes for an even more romantic story than Pride and Prejudice provides.

 

In some ways – though I didn’t know it at the time, I was thinking of this when I started writing Mr. Darcy’s Pledge. I wanted to write something about the repercussions of Elizabeth’s rejection, not just in terms of what Darcy would feel, but what, in fact, he would have done about it. How would a gentleman as proud as Mr. Darcy – one reared to consider status as paramount – have reacted to being dismissed as a potential husband by someone like Miss Elizabeth Bennet.

 

We know how Mr. Collins reacted. He simply proposed to someone else. Would Darcy have done the same?

 

Unlike Captain Wentworth, who determines to prove to Anne that he is worthy of her by making his way up through the ranks, Darcy has all the wealth Elizabeth could possibly dream of. Really, he is left with very little to go on. Elizabeth doesn’t like him. She doesn’t care for what he can offer her. To her, he just isn’t a nice person. How do you respond to that kind of accusation? Is there, in fact, even any point in trying to win her affection?

 

In Mr. Darcy’s Pledge, Darcy takes her rejection at face value and decides that he might as well move on with his life and put the whole excruciating episode behind him. Not that he doesn’t suffer.  Like anyone who gets rejected, he feels miserable, but with a stiff upper lip he determines that it is his duty as a gentleman to beget an heir for Pemberley. His heart may argue that no one but Elizabeth will do, but his mind insists that, at twenty-eight, he needs to secure his inheritance. Like the Earl of Grantham in Downton Abbey, who says (to paraphrase) that Downton Abbey is not his – he holds it in trust for future generations – Darcy also has a duty to think of Pemberley and the succession.

 

In that sense, then, the cover of Mr. Darcy’s Pledge represents the choice Darcy needs to make between Pemberley and his heart’s desire. Unlike Wentworth, he cannot simply wait endlessly for the future to take shape. He has to take action.

 

Which is why Darcy, in Mr. Darcy’s Pledge, Darcy has to put aside his own feelings and find a wife.

 

If you are curious to discover who he chooses, I am offering a free Kindle copy as a Giveaway.

I’m thrilled to be back again so soon on Indie Jane after having had my say just a couple of weeks ago about the Jane Austen heroine who doesn’t get as much attention as she ought — Emma. I really enjoyed the discussion of Emma here last month.

 

But today my focus is someone different entirely. It’s Mr. Darcy, whom everyone will agree is the star of the Austen cannon, with perhaps the exception of Captain Wentworth.

Though perhaps, in the interest of making a comparison, that in some ways Wentworth scores higher than Darcy. This is because, despite the angst depicted in many of our JA variations and continuations, Darcy does not really have to suffer for long. Things work out for him relatively quickly.

 

What makes Wentworth truly swoon-worthy in my mind is his constancy – the fact that, even after being rejected and after years of separation, he has remained faithful to Anne. In my mind, that makes for an even more romantic story than Pride and Prejudice provides.

 

In some ways – though I didn’t know it at the time, I was thinking of this when I started writing Mr. Darcy’s Pledge. I wanted to write something about the repercussions of Elizabeth’s rejection, not just in terms of what Darcy would feel, but what, in fact, he would have done about it. How would a gentleman as proud as Mr. Darcy – one reared to consider status as paramount – have reacted to being dismissed as a potential husband by someone like Miss Elizabeth Bennet.

 

We know how Mr. Collins reacted. He simply proposed to someone else. Would Darcy have done the same?

 

Unlike Captain Wentworth, who determines to prove to Anne that he is worthy of her by making his way up through the ranks, Darcy has all the wealth Elizabeth could possibly dream of. Really, he is left with very little to go on. Elizabeth doesn’t like him. She doesn’t care for what he can offer her. To her, he just isn’t a nice person. How do you respond to that kind of accusation? Is there, in fact, even any point in trying to win her affection?

 

In Mr. Darcy’s Pledge, Darcy takes her rejection at face value and decides that he might as well move on with his life and put the whole excruciating episode behind him. Not that he doesn’t suffer.  Like anyone who gets rejected, he feels miserable, but with a stiff upper lip he determines that it is his duty as a gentleman to beget an heir for Pemberley. His heart may argue that no one but Elizabeth will do, but his mind insists that, at twenty-eight, he needs to secure his inheritance. Like the Earl of Grantham in Downton Abbey, who says (to paraphrase) that Downton Abbey is not his – he holds it in trust for future generations – Darcy also has a duty to think of Pemberley and the succession.

 

In that sense, then, the cover of Mr. Darcy’s Pledge represents the choice Darcy needs to make between Pemberley and his heart’s desire. Unlike Wentworth, he cannot simply wait endlessly for the future to take shape. He has to take action.

 

Which is why Darcy, in Mr. Darcy’s Pledge, Darcy has to put aside his own feelings and find a wife.

 

If you are curious to discover who he chooses, I am offering a free Kindle copy as a Giveaway. Please leave a comment comparing Mr. Darcy with Captain Wentworth for a chance to win (then let us know in the rafflecopter widget below that you did).

 

a Rafflecopter giveaway

 

 

Mr Darcys Pledge Cover MEDIUM WEB

 

Torn between his heart and his mind… Mr. Darcy must make a choice.

 

Fitzwilliam Darcy has always been able to keep his emotions under control. That is, until he falls under the spell of Elizabeth Bennet and surprises himself by blurting out a proposal to her like a moonstruck youth. Stung to the quick by her rejection, his pride in tatters, and left with no possibility that she will ever return his regard, Darcy determines to put all thoughts of Elizabeth behind him. But not even Town with its boundless opportunities for amusement can keep the image of Elizabeth Bennet from pursuing him everywhere he goes.

 

By the time Darcy leaves Town to travel up to Pemberley, he has learned one thing. There is only one way of overcoming Miss Bennet’s bewitching hold over him and Darcy is desperate enough to try it. The solution is to get married. And this time, he is not going to choose a wife by allowing his emotions to lead him by the nose.

 

His choice will be entirely rational…

 

In Volume I of this Pride and Prejudice variation, Monica Fairview traces Mr. Darcy’s journey as he struggles to come to terms with the upheaval Elizabeth Bennet has caused in his life…and his heart.     

*****

Monica FairviewMonica Fairview is an ex-literature professor who abandoned teaching criticism about long gone authors who can’t defend themselves in order to write novels of her own. Monica can be described as a wanderer, opening her eyes to life in London and travelling ever since. She spent many years in the USA before coming back full circle to London, thus proving that the world is undeniably round.
Monica’s first novel, An Improper Suitor, a humorous Regency, was short-listed for the Romantic Novelists’ Association’s Joan Hassayan prize. Since then, she has written two traditional Jane Austen sequels: The Other Mr. Darcy and The Darcy Cousins (both published by Sourcebooks) and contributed a short sequel to Emma in Laurel Ann Nattress’s anthology Jane Austen Made Me Do It (Ballantine). Originally a lover of everything Regency, Monica has since discovered that the Victorian period can be jolly good fun, too, if seen with retro-vision and rose-colored goggles. She adores Jane Austen, Steampunk, cats, her husband and her impossible child. You can find Monica online at her website and on Facebook.

Related Posts

Share This

39 Comments

  1. Wentworth is more constant, he does try to fall in love with the Miss Musgroves but Anne just so much more superior. But Darcy doesn’t get tested – its under a year from the rejection to the successful proposal

    • Hello Vesper — Wentworth had Anne worried, though, didn’t he? Isn’t it interesting how different the two stories are?

  2. Ruth clapp

    Mr. Darcy gained immortality by providing the model of all the future heroes of romances–the very common men who are hated by the heroine until they aren’t. Captain Wentworth is a much nicer man, not troubled by believing he is better than others. Even when his focus was on the hurt that Anne had done to him, he was kind to her and it really didn’t take him long to realize that he still loved her. On the goodness scale, Wentworth wins.

    • Spot on, Ruth! I’ve always though Jane Austen provided the blueprint for all the Mills and Boon romances. It’s a strange thing that we like to have the heroine “tame” the masterful, arrogant man, even now. Imagine in her time, when men actually had all the power! Wentworth wins when it comes to niceness. Shall we say Alpha man vs. beta male or is that going too far?

  3. Anji

    Can Darcy really be that rational when he’s so much in love? I guess we have to read the book to find out! Would love to win a copy but will be getting one eventually as it,s already on my Wish List.

    • Anji — thank you for stopping by. I’m enjoying your various comments.

      • Anji

        Sorry, just realised I didn’t add my comparison between Darcy and CFW. The latter is probably easier to like from the outset as he HAD declared himself and proposed once he’d realised he was in love with Anne. We all probably hated him when he tried to fall in love with one of the Musgrove girls. Thankfully, good sense won in the end, he realised what a jewel he had in Anne and then had to have some suffering of his own when he saw Mr. Elliot trying to woo her.

        Darcy, on the other hand, isn’t very likeable in the beginning as we only have Elizabeth’s, and others’, observations to go on regarding his character. We don’t know that he’s basically shy amongst people he doesn’t know till much later on. Unlike CFW, he doesn’t try to forget his one and only by trying to fall in love with any other young lady of his acquaintance. Presumably there must have been some, but as they were probably after him for money and position, someone of Darcy’s character would find it virtually impossible to form any sort of relationship with a girl like that.

        Another thought just ocurred as I was typing the above. CFW was, I assume, a lot younger when he fell in love with Anne than Darcy was when he fell in Love with Elizabeth. Early, as opposed to late, twenties? That’s bound to be a significant factor, too.

  4. Wendy Roberts

    I know that this is sacrilege, but I haven’t read Sense and Sensibility, yet! Don’t hurt me!

    • Wendy Roberts

      Son of a!!! I meant to type Persuasion! Augh! Just delete my comments!

      • Wendy — it isn’t sacriledge. It’s wonderful. Now you have something to look forward to!! I wish I was in your shoes. It would be lovely to discover another Jane Austen book.

  5. Deborah

    Wentworth remained true to Anne and didn’t contemplate marriage again for about 8 years. Darcy suffers, but only has to wait year before Lizzy accepts him. Elizabeth puts Darcy in turmoil, but Wentworth has Anne in turmoil.

  6. Eva E

    OH, my, who does Darcy choose and what about Elizabeth? I am all a flutter with anxiety. Thank you for the giveaway. Your premise is intriguing.

    • Eva E — aha! I can’t tell, can I? However, I can assure you that I prefer comedy to tragedy. Thank you for coming by to take a look and good luck!

  7. Amanda Mauldin

    I absolutely love Ms. Fairview’s books. She is an excellent writer. She made me feel for Caroline Bingley! That’s just hard. So I look forward to reading this new book very much.

    • Thank you, Amanda. Yes, I flew against common wisdom in The Other Mr. Darcy, didn’t I? This one is a little bit more conventional (or at least as conventional as I can get). Thank you for your kind words.

  8. Sophia Rose

    In circumstances, there is really no comparison just as there is no comparison in how those around them respond and advise, IMHO. That leaves just their own response to rejection and their personalities coming into play. Darcy went into shock and then took her reproofs to heart. Wentworth got angry and tried to forget. Wentworth was going up against so much and not just Anne’s rejection plus he had a career to advance in and Darcy only had to get past Elizabeth really since he was already established.

    Looking forward to reading Monica’s new variation. ;)

    • Thank you, Sophia! We know Darcy suffered but Jane Austen took it a step further in Persuasion, didn’t she? You raised a good point — Wentworth had to deal with social pressure from Anne’s family and friends, so in that sense he’s more like Lizzy than like Darcy.
      Thank you for stopping by.

  9. Ada Vittoria

    Wentworth is surely more romantic but one must remember who his suit was accepted by Anne, who later broke the engagement under pressure… He know who Anne’s rejection is not his fault and neither hers but the result of Lady Russell’s pressure and prejudice… And I think who if he try to fall in love and court Louisa Musgrove is mostly because he need to distance himself from Anne and her family (and I’m sure who he do it only because he fear who Anne had forgotten him or lady Russell will persuade her again to reject him). Darcy instead know who Elizabeth reject him for many reasons who are his fault: sure she interpreted them incorrectly, but all of them are relatewd to his many mistakes (the rude comment about her at the Meryton Assembly, his proud and arrogant attitude, the decision of not warning anyone about Wickham’s character, the decision of helping Caroline to separe Bingley and Jane, how he propose to Elizabeth) so he (who can not really blame Elizabeth for refusing him when her disinterest for his wealth and prestige are one of the thing who attact him firstly) try to correct his bad habits hoping to reconquist at least her good opinion (and ended winning her heart and hand). One thing common to Darcy and Wentworth is the fact that once fallen in love they can not forget the woman they loved even if they think that they can not ever have her.

    • Thank you for your insight, Ada. I didn’t think of that, but yes, Darcy knows he’s to blame whereas it’s Anne who chances her mind and so it’s her fault. In a sense, though, to take it a step further, Wentworth knows the reason Anne broke it off is because he’s not wealthy/worthy enough, so in a sense he, too has to change to win her love. Completely different reasons, but a similar idea.

  10. Kari Singh

    Oh, so much angst! I look forward to it!

  11. JoyK

    Monica, great question to stir the gray matter. Jane Austen developed the heroes in both stories fairly similarly in my point of view. They both used rejection as an opportunity to fix what needed fixing. Darcy had personality issues to work on and Wentworth needed wealth. Practicality determines that it would take much longer for a sea-faring man to improve his circumstances to the point of early retirement than it would for a typical man to recognize a fault and take steps to correct it.

    Where the similarity ends, for me, is pride. Darcy is proud of who and what he is when he meets Elizabeth. He has to learn humility. Wentworth starts out humble and learns and earns pride and the respect of others.

    I do think I will be pondering this for a long while. Thanks for the question and the great post.

    • Well, Joy, it’s something I’m still pondering myself. I think it’s remarkable that Austen such memorable heroes who are at first glance quite dissimilar. Food for thought, don’t you think?

  12. Regina Silvia

    While I am just beginning to get into reading sequels, what if’s, etc re: Persuasion, I have been reading those associated with Pride and Prejudice for years. This sounds like a book I would like as I continue to explore the differences between the two couples presented in these books.

  13. Chiara

    They are different, but also have some similarities; each of them is special in his own way. Capitan Wentworth is more open, he tries to forget Anne or what he feels becouse he is disappointed by her past behavior. While Mr Darcy know very well that Elizabeth never loved him when he proposed the first time. The feelings of Both men changed during the story , at first they loved unconditionally,but only after the refusal and the absence from their beloved, I think, they truly understand what love is.

    • You put your finger on an important element they have in common, Chiara. I agree with you, that in their case they learn a lot about themselves after falling in love.

  14. Maria

    Although Darcy is my absolute favourite (I will always choose him over anyone!), Wentworth is the most romantic and suffers more than Darcy. They are both deeply in love but the things, events they experience are completely different. The most evident thing they have in common is that they are faithful to their hearts. They will always love and protect Elizabeth and Anne no matter what and despite all the young, charming women they might encounter!

    • Maria — that’s so lovely! I think you’ve captured what they have in common very well. Thank you for sharing your thoughts.

  15. Stephanie Carrico

    Darcy and Wentworth are similar…proud, intense men..another shared trait is constancy…Darcy took Elizabeth’s judgements to heart and tried to be a better man. While Wentworth took Anne’s rejection to heart and strived to succeed in his career. Both men loved unconditionally and stayed true…even if Wentworth took awhile to realize this.

    • I really like your description, Stephanie. Both men are proud and intense, in very different ways. In Wentworth’s case, he’s too proud to address Anne again even when his fortune has improved. In Darcy’s case, his pride gets in his way during the proposal. Fortunately for both of them, fate helped them out a bit. Another similarity is that they both communicate better through writing letters, it seems, than talking directly. Is that a case of pride or fear of rejection, do you think?

  16. JJ

    I think both Darcy and Wentworth suffered and triumphed in love by being true to themselves and showing who they really are to the women they love. Darcy – by showing how gentlemanly (despited Elizabeth’s protestations otherwise in his 1st proposal) and caring he is that he is willing to sacrifice his reputation and turn away from his familial obligations in marrying in his station proved him worth of Elizabeth’s trust, respect and ultimately – love. On the other hand, Wentworth has tried to look for someone who can replace Anne and tried to fool himself that he can, but when he submitted to his true feelings that he can never love another – he felt free and things just fell into their own places. Such two loveable heroes. :) *lesigh*

    • JJ — it is lovely to contemplate such devotion, I agree. The point you make about both men being willing to reveal who they really are makes sense. We can only imagine how difficult that must have been for men who are essentially quite proud.

  17. Jj

    Yay I won, thanks Indie Jane! And I also just reread my comment and shameful that my grammar went out of the door! Haha guess I was too excited!!! Can I have it in .mobi format please for Kindle? :)

    • Jessica Grey

      Congrats! I’ve let Monica know your format preference.

      • Jj

        Hi Jessica! I haven’t received my ebook yet. :( Do you have any news when Ms. Fairview will be able to send it? Thanks!

        • Jessica Grey

          JJ – I will follow up, our email has been down a week so if she emailed me with any issues I haven’t been able to receive messages. Thanks!

          • JJ

            Hi Jess! Thanks. I haven’t received the ebook even until today. :(

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *

You may use these HTML tags and attributes: <a href="" title=""> <abbr title=""> <acronym title=""> <b> <blockquote cite=""> <cite> <code> <del datetime=""> <em> <i> <q cite=""> <strike> <strong>